Learn

A pink flower blooming on our property.

There's so much to our tour!

Not only will you enjoy the thrill of the zip lines and the beauty of the canopy, but there's so much to learn! Learning about the work we do to care for the land, the rich history of our island, and the local flora and fauna is the "cherry on top" of your canopy tour experience!

Animals

Select a topic below to learn more

Beavers and Salmon

Learn how beaver ponds on our island help to foster a healthy environment for local salmon.
Learn More at the Following Site:
UW Earth and Space Sciences

Pacific Northwest Salmon

Learn all about the salmon that call our island home and how salmon play a larger role in Washington's ecology.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

Beaver

Though small, beavers are industrious and can habe major impacts on ecology.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

Our Island

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History and Early Inhabitants

Learn about the native people who lived on Comano Island before us and learn about how it has evolved over time.
Learn More at the Following Site:
HistoryLink.org

Formation of Comano Island

Our land did not just appear, it was made by geological processes. Learn about the geology of the region that makes our island what it is!
Learn More at the Following Site:
Washington Dept. of Natural Resources

Plants

Select a topic below to learn more

Douglas Fir

Get to know the "iconic" PNW tree.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Wikipedia 'Douglas Fir'

Woody Debris in Streams

Fallen trees and limbs play a big role in the health of streams and rivers.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Wikipedia 'Coarse Woody Debris'

Morel

The Morel is a mushroom found all over the PNW in Spring and Summer. It is popular with foragers.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Wikipedia 'Morel'

Forest Understory

Everything in the forest works together, and the understory is where the collaboration plays out.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Wikipedia 'Understory'

Salmonberry

As a Northwest native plant Salmonberry is well known for colonizing wet sites west of the Cascades and for its reddish-orange raspberry-like fruits.
Learn More at the Following Site:
WSU Clark County Extension

Red Elderberry

The red berries of this plant make it pop, adding a splash of color to native plant gardens.
Learn More at the Following Site:
WSU Clark County Extension

Salal

This plant helps to bind the soil around native trees and is used frequently by florists.
Learn More at the Following Site:
WSU Clark County Extension

Red Huckleberry

The red huckleberry produces sour berries that have been eaten for thousands of years.
Learn More at the Following Site:
WSU Clark County Extension

Swordfern

Found all around the forest floor on our tour, the sword fern is ubiquitous to the PNW.
Learn More at the Following Site:
WSU Clark County Extension

Thimbleberry

Found all around our tour, this relative of the cultivated red raspberry gets its name from its thimble-shaped berries.
Learn More at the Following Site:
WSU Clark County Extenstion

Trees

Select a topic below to learn more

Red Alder

This useful plant makes its home in the wet coastal plains of the PNW.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Natural Resources Conservation Service

Snags

Snags are the remains of fallen trees that serve an import ecological role in our forest.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Wa Department of Fish & Wildlife

Big Leaf Maple

This deciduous tree is known for is large palmate leaves.
Learn More at the Following Site:
National Park Service

Western Hemlock

Used in medicine for a centuries, this conifer makes its home deep in the forest.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Natural Resources Conservation Service

Western Redcedar

This conifer loves moisture, doing well in the fog and rain of Western Washington.
Learn More at the Following Site:
Oregon Department of Forestry